Mycelium

Mycelium is the thread-like structure of fungi & the bacteria found in rotting organisms. It grows through the decomposition of various complex organic compounds, converts biomass to compost, & enhances crop yields through its symbiotic relationship with plants.



CULTIVATION PROCESS

- Agricultural waste + organic substrate + fungal products


- First step- Inoculation: organic & agricultural waste cleaned (boiled) and combined with mycelium (mushroom or fungus). mycelium grows around the waste sending out roots & fibers which digest the materials

- Second step- Cultivation & Shaping: the digest is broken up & put into moulds

- Third Step- Drying: the solid obtained is pulled from the mold and heat dried to stop the mycelium from growing any further.


- Suitable Conditions:

- Inoculation: at 3-5 days - room temperature (21-26 degrees Celsius), damp environment, no lighting or ventilation.

- Cultivation & Shaping: at 10-15 days - room temperature (21-26 degrees Celsius), damp environment, no lighting or ventilation.

- Drying: at 20-25 days - room temperature (21-26 degrees Celsius), damp environment, more lighting & ventilation.




AESTHETIC

- Any mould could be used to obtain the desired form.

- Colors and textures vary depending on the agricultural & organic waste used.



USES

3d printing, textile, bricks, myco-crete, panels, tensile structures, insulation.


PERFOMANCE

. mold & water resistant

. traps heat

. fireproof

. acoustic absorber

. high in compressive strength

. weak in tension and bending

(compression & ramming during growth offers vast improvements in its ability to withstand dynamic forces)



DURABILITY

. decomposes within 6 weeks when in contact with soil (biodegradable)

. changes in consistency and quality, swells, & shrinks in certain weather conditions, but retains its functions.



REAL LIFE EXAMPLES


Growing Pavilion, Dutch

Design Week, by set designer and artist Pascal Leboucq in collaboration with Erik Klarenbeek's studio Krown Design








Tower of "grown" bio-bricks by The Living, MoMA PS1




















Mycelium Tree Structure, by

architect Dirk Hebel and

engineer Philippe Block
















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